Shigatsu wa Kimi no Uso - Review *SPOILERS*
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    Default Shigatsu wa Kimi no Uso - Review *SPOILERS*

    Hello, all.

    I was asked to offer my perspective on Your Lie In April, since my view on it is different from that of others. While many enjoyed this anime, I also liked aspects of it, but overall didn't think it was amazing. I ask that you respect that, as my opinion, in the same way that I respect all of yours.

    Let's start with what I liked. I heartily enjoyed the music; the soundtrack for this anime was amazing, which is something I rarely say about anime anymore. It pays a welcome tribute to many of the classic piano, harpsichord, and orchestral composers of the 1500-1800s in Europe. I buy the OST for very few animes, but I did for Your Lie In April. It was $40 well spent.

    I also enjoyed the conflict between musicians that the anime portrayed. The world of music is a pretty fierce battleground if your intention is to make a living in it, and with the rise of the Internet, it's really easy for artists who would have otherwise been unheard-of to get their music out to the world. There's sadly a lot of competition between musicians in the world today, and the anime does a good job of demonstrating this.

    And now comes the part I might get shot for: what I didn't like. I'm going to cut Shigatsu open; you have been warned.

    The anime is (in my opinion) overly-emotional. There's a lot of crying that takes place, and while a good chunk of it is believable, a lot of it isn't. A lot of people break down into tears due to their own inaction, their own inability, or their own initiative. Relationship issues? Let's cry those out over a nice hot cup of tea.

    But the main thing I didn't like about the anime was the perspective it offered on "giving up" or surrendering to failure when you encounter hardship. This struck me as particularly strange because I've been an active musician for a number of years now, own my own recording studio, and play live with my band or as a solo artist on a pretty consistent basis. I have bad days at that job, like most people do with theirs. Have I cried over it? On a few occasions, yes. Did I pick myself back up and keep on going? Absolutely - it was my dream, and I won't throw my dreams away over the hardships I'll face to make them happen.

    I couldn't really relate to Kosei at all in that regard. Giving up a dream over the death of a family member, content to sit in misery because you don't have the courage to do what you really want to do, and worst of all, KNOWING that you CAN succeed if you tried. Exceptional musicians tend to be the kind of people who ignore what most other people think of them; to be honest, that's how incredible music that changes the world gets made. If I'd listened to my dad when he told me he hated my music ideas in high school, I would have thrown that life dream away. Would I have replaced it with something else over time? I don't know. I would have been a miserable person because of it.

    At the end of the day, accomplishing your dreams will inevitably drive a wedge between you and other people, and maybe even between you and a piece of yourself. It's up to you to decide whether it's worth it or not. Just don't make that decision, then regret the consequences in a state of indecision for the rest of your life, and complain to me about it.

    Finally, the romance aspect of the anime was tragic, yet didn't sink in for me. Again, Kosei is such a prime example of "baseless indecision" that it frankly saddened me more than the romance aspect of the anime did. I can't relate to his concept of "I want this so badly, but I'm not willing to do anything to get it, so I just sit around and cry a bunch". He proved in the past that he could pour countless hours of his life into playing piano to become almost Godlike at it, but he suddenly doesn't have that same passion for anything a few years later in his life, including playing the piano again?

    At the end of the day, I rated it a 6/10 here on OS. It was an entertaining watch, but not an anime that I'd pick up again. OST and several of the life examples were solid, but more life examples weren't great, and the core plot of the story has some sizable holes in it.

  2. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to LastVanguard For This Useful Post:

    PotatoStyle (04-14-2016), Tiotsh (06-15-2016)

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    I can agree with your final opinion the anime was decent, but not extraordinary. Thanks for this review!

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    nice ! review LastVanguard ! i really agree with you ! its an overrated anime if you ask me too !

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    Death Moonlight Prince sasuke15y's Avatar
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    I also agree to your post. The animation is marvelous with bright, vibrant colors that bring the characters fully to life and the soundtrack artfully matches the emotions intended to be represented in every scene. Your Lie in April conveys emotion to us not just visually but aurally as well.

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    Hontouni atama ni kuru :| Keir06's Avatar
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    I think that what you're saying is true, also. It's pretty okay but it's kinda overrated.

    I guess I also did not like how giving up on something was emphasized-- Then again, it focuses more on the drama side rather than the shounen's motivational element.. We can't expect that all would be well. I agree to what you have said.
    Last edited by Keir06; 04-28-2016 at 09:12 AM. Reason: Typographical error

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    Pretty straight forward review :)

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    Hi!

    Thank you for your review.

    First of all, I respect your review on Shigatsu and your ideas seem relevant to me.

    As you implied, and I would agree with that, Shigatsu was a bit too much tear-jerking, and it could have been prevented. I can't say I have a tenth of your background in music, but I reckon that music being essentially emotional, it must depend on one's sensibility to truly judge that emotional aspect. That is why I also really enjoyed the soundtrack and how they arranged each composition.

    On the other hand, I think I didn't see the 'giving up' part from the same perspective:
    As a child, his mother's dream was taking a toll upon our main character, but it was not his own. What is there to give up, if music appears as a means to help another person, if that person is already gone?
    It only left the character in a void. In fact, music turns out to remain a legacy more than a personal quest at the beginning, and somehow a burden.
    When Kaori appears, it is then and only then that Kousei learns a new and personal definition of music - what he was desperately looking for sub-consciously.
    At first twitched between his past and this new perspective, he struggles and gradually accepts his self and his own motivation through his friends.
    Music gets a new meaning, and he tries to connect what it used to be with what he can feel it could be.
    So, in the end I didn't feel like Kousei had 'given up', strictly speaking. The passion you mentioned I think was not present to begin with, hence the sobriquet he's given. Playing perfectly along with the chords through practice, but not truly emotionally.
    In retrospect, when we observe Kousei-child smiling, it appears as a relief to have accomplished something destined to his mother and her recovery more than satisfaction (which would be turned towards himself)

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